Prandially Yours: Candle Cafe West

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Post photo courtesy of http://taliafuhrman.com

Prandially Yours:

Candle Cafe West

-A Monthly Column By Joshua Wanger, Featuring NYC Restaurant Reviews-

Start the new year off right by making a reservation at this stellar vegan restaurant! Sure to please any guest, be they vegan or otherwise, the all-organic menu presents several enjoyable dishes comprised of socially and environmentally responsible ingredients. Executive Chef Angel Ramos, who worked at the original Candle Cafe and Candle 79 (both on the Upper East Side), has continued to refine and master the techniques of organic vegan cooking, blending textures and international flavors to sate any palate.

The restaurant layout provides ample seating without ever feeling crowded. Diners will relax in the warm, cheerful environment whether they are cozied up to the bar or celebrating with a larger party at a table.

To start, order any of the fresh (and refreshing), house-made juices, smoothies, or sodas. The staff can guide you through the drinks, offering you helpful suggestions based on your preferences. Next, consider ordering several appetizers to share with your party. The famous mezze plate comes with hummus, baba ganoush, tabouli, lemon-date chutney, olives, zaatar, Parata bread, and crudité and is great for sharing. The candle nachos also divide nicely among a larger party and start the meal off with great flavor.

For the main course, try any of the fantastic Farmers’ Market Entrées. Favorites include the pomegranate chipotle grilled tempeh and the live lasagna. A slightly sweet and spicy dish, the grilled tempeh is paired with sweet potato purée, Brussels sprouts, leeks, mole sauce, and a fennel–apple salad. The live lasagna offers the best of the garden: Fresh heirloom tomatoes, zucchini, and wild mushrooms are sliced and layered with cashew cheese, kale–pine nut pesto, and a balsamic–black pepper reduction, creating a dish both aesthetically beautiful and delicious.

If you manage to save room for dessert, check out Candle’s seasonal dessert menu. The Almond Joy pie is a sure bet, but the live pear tart, offering a lighter finish to the meal, also deserves consideration. Enjoy the subtle sweetness of the tart and spicy ginger ice cream with a French Connection, a lovely, orangey coffee cocktail.

Candle Cafe West is the very welcome upscale vegan restaurant the Upper West Side needs: Bring a date or a whole party for a special occasion or just for a night out. If you want to stay in, the restaurant also offers delivery and take-out.

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Post photo courtesy of http://taliafuhrman.com

 

Big Screen Streaming: The Return of the Jedi

Big Screen Streaming: Star Wars – Return of the Jedi

-Film Reviewed by Roger Market

NOTE: The following review may contain spoilers for the other episodes in the Star Wars series.

The next chapter in the Star Wars universe, The Force Awakens, debuts in U.S. theaters on December 18. Now is the time to catch up on the saga. Viewers, however, have a major decision to make regarding the best way to watch, and diehard fans have strong opinions on the matter. One option is to watch the series from the chronological beginning, even though the “first” three films (technically, the prequels) were made decades after the original trilogy; watching the movies out of the original order may ruin some surprises. Another option is to watch the original trilogy followed by the prequel trilogy—the order in which the films were released. Lastly, some may choose to watch only the original trilogy or only the prequel trilogy. Whichever method you go with, your route will almost surely lead you, at some point, to Return of the Jedi, which is the end of the original trilogy and a wonderful lead-in for Episode VII: The Force Awakens.

Return of the Jedi begins as all Star Wars movies do. Over a black screen, the iconic blue words flash: “A long time ago in a galaxy far, far away . . . .” Next, the Star Wars logo appears in yellow, followed by the signature text crawl that explains the context of the movie. The words move not toward the top of the screen but to a vanishing point somewhere near the middle of the screen, angling away from the viewer.

The text crawl eventually gives way to an expanse of starry space, and a massive, rounded celestial object appears on screen. This is the new Death Star. Darth Vader is supervising the construction of this mighty weapon with the power to destroy entire planets. Another large ship floats into the scene, releasing a shuttle that proceeds to the Death Star’s docking bay. There, a crowd of stormtroopers and officers gather. A nervous commander greets Vader. He has the unfortunate task of telling the Sith Lord that construction may be delayed. Although viewers should know by now that even Darth Vader has a master, this scene is one of several fantastic reminders in Return of the Jedi. “The emperor is not as forgiving as I am,” Darth Vader responds. This exchange sets the scene for the emperor’s grand arrival and his prominence later in the movie.

Meanwhile, the lovable scoundrel pilot of the Millennium Falcon, Han Solo, remains frozen in carbonite and is held hostage by Jabba the Hutt (a result of the previous major battle in The Empire Strikes Back). In plotting a rescue mission, our heroes have a daunting task before them. The droids—C3PO and R2-D2—penetrate Jabba’s lair bearing a hologram message in which Luke Skywalker pleads for Han Solo’s release. As expected, Jabba doesn’t take the message seriously. The droids are rendered his servants. Next, a masked bounty hunter arrives at Jabba’s palace. The bounty hunter has captured Han’s trusted co-pilot and devoted friend, the hulking but affable Wookie Chewbacca. He leads “Chewy” into Jabba’s court in chains and demands an audience with Jabba by threatening to incinerate the room with a “thermal detonator.” While everyone is sleeping that night, the bounty hunter sneaks into the room with Han and frees him from his carbonite prison. The bounty hunter then takes off his mask and reveals himself to be … Princess Leia! The two share a brief romantic reunion, which is interrupted by Jabba, who is is not asleep. Now, with almost the entire good-guy squad in Jabba’s hands, Luke Skywalker makes his triumphant entrance. This version of Luke is a far cry from the naïve young farmer from A New Hope or the amateur Jedi knight who bravely, yet foolishly confronted Darth Vader in The Empire Strikes Back. By now, Luke’s training is nearly complete. He’s cunning and experienced, well on his way to becoming an official Jedi. In fact, the last Jedi. The inevitable escape from Jabba’s lair is extensive and thus constitutes the entire first act of the film. The beginning of the next act takes viewers back to the Death Star as the emperor finally appears in the flesh (NOTE: viewers who have seen the prequels by now will have already seen him “in person”).

The emperor’s ancient appearance and deep, insidious voice paint him as a master far more advanced than Darth Vader, who is but a humble servant. It’s strange seeing Vader in the secondary villain role, bowing to such a frail-looking man, but the emperor is anything but frail. He’s a sinister being with a plan to turn Luke to the dark side of “The Force” and take over the entire galaxy. Darth Vader, who is now confirmed to be Luke’s father after that cat was let out of the proverbial bag in The Empire Strikes Back, is considered key in winning Luke over.

The stage is set for a climactic battle. The Rebel Alliance has mustered all its ships and fighters to mount an attack on the new Death Star. Lando Calrissian, the former governor of Cloud City, is elected to lead the assault, but first, an expeditionary force including Luke, Leia, Han, Chewy, and their trusted droids must disable a shield generator on the forest moon of Endor. Here, of course, we encounter the Ewoks, a tribe of cuddly yet seemingly barbaric hunters who turn out to be trusted allies when they believe the awkward and nervous C3PO is a golden god.

Humor, suspense, and romance drive the Endor sequence, but at its core, the Star Wars saga, and especially Return of the Jedi, is an age-old tale of good vs. evil told through the lens of a metaphysical power called The Force. At the root of this contest is a single conflicted family—a father and son (and daughter, it turns out). Throughout the franchise, the complexity of family drama becomes increasingly apparent as bombshell after bombshell is revealed, culminating in Return of the Jedi. The Force, too, rises in importance as the saga continues. Ultimately, family and The Force are inextricably linked, as Luke and Vader are so bound up in opposite sides of this metaphysical power that it defines their relationship. While Luke is the embodiment of good, his father, Darth Vader, is the quintessential misunderstood villain. Both are vulnerable to their emotional connection and can be swayed from one side of The Force to the other. They can achieve extreme evil together, doing the emperor’s bidding in the process, or they can join forces and save the galaxy from the emperor’s evil plan. The choice is up to them.

Though not all viewers enjoy the entire series, Star Wars proves time and again that it has commercial staying power due largely to its universal themes (no pun intended). After all, few films in Hollywood are successful enough to be granted a sequel, let alone eight or more follow-ups, which is the current plan for the franchise. Soon, the baton will be passed to The Force Awakens, the long-awaited sequel that picks up thirty years after the thrilling events of Return of the Jedi. So if there’s one movie that viewers should watch before heading into theaters on December 18, Jedi demands a second look. Of course, true purists will re-watch all six—even if the ride is a little bumpy in spots.

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Post Photo Courtesy of en.wikipedia.org

#FlashTag: Tense Quiet

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Monologging.org invites you to help create collaborative flash fiction. The following picture-inspired story, featuring photography by Monologging artist, Casper Ulvscov, needs to be completed by Saturday, December 5th. Every day, different authors around the world will be selected to contribute the next line. Find out how to submit your twist to the evolving plot by visiting the #FlashTag Submission Guidelines… Submit Free!

Post Photo by Duizer

Post Photo by Duizer

 

Tense Quiet

 

   Armed men patrolled the streets.

“Honey, don’t sit by the window,” Carly told her curious son. They’d heard gunshots the previous evening.

  “I want to see!” Pierre complained. He liked counting the men in uniform.

 @JeffreyFBarken The doorbell rang. Moments later someone knocked on the door. Carly grabbed a knife from the kitchen drawer. “Hide!” she whispered to Pierre.

Pierre snarled, “I’m not afraid!” but he did as his mother said. He climbed into the old blanket chest and waited.

 

 

 

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Prandially Yours: Semilla

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Post Photo Courtesy of freewilliamsburg.com

Prandially Yours: Semilla

-A Monthly Column By Joshua Wanger, Featuring NYC Restaurant Reviews-

Diners rarely expect to find an affordable tasting menu anywhere in New York City, especially in the hip and buzzing neighborhood of Williamsburg. The notion of a tasting menu hails back to the 1990s when master chefs Ferran Adrià and Thomas Keller began offering bite-sized selections at their restaurants, El Bulli and French Laundry, respectively. Instead of the typical appetizer–entrée–dessert chosen by the patron, tasting menus leave all the work of deciding what to eat to the chefs. Chefs Adrià and Keller offered 40-or-more–course tasting menus spanning entire evenings. This was not your typical night out.

Tasting menus are now readily available in any major city, allowing average diners to experience a wide array of foods curated to showcase the talents of the chefs. At Semilla, Chef José Ramírez-Ruiz regularly designs new, vegetable-forward tasting menus, serving up to 18 diners gathered in the small space. There is no printed menu, so each plate is a surprise (unless you happen to sneak a peek at your neighbor’s dish). Several knowledgeable and friendly servers present about ten courses ($85 per person) and a 6-course wine tasting ($60 per person).

On this occasion, a BBQ sunchoke bun with tomato and sesame vinaigrette begins the meal. Served in a bamboo basket, the steamed bun provides a tender and delightful shell for the rich umami of the sunchokes. The tomato and sesame vinaigrette rounds out the flavor, coating the mouth. Following closely behind is a butternut squash with pickled quince and foie gras. The presentation is everything: The thinly sliced vegetable ribbons come folded delicately with the pickled quince and foie gras, creating a crunchy texture and rich, sweet, and slightly tangy flavor.

Two of six uncommon beverages accompany the first courses: an American sour called Purple Prose from Grimm Artisanal Ales and a French 2012 sciaccarello called Damianu from Domaine U Stiliccionu. The sour is produced with aged noble hops, ripe red fruit, and white oak. The drink is incredibly refreshing, clean, and fruity, but the aged qualities offer subtle complexities hinting at the meal to come. Like all the wines served at Semilla, the Damianu is a natural wine, meaning it did not have any chemical or mechanical intervention during production. This bright and fruity tasting wine wields a spicy scent and is nicely paired with the rich foie gras dish.

The next two courses are served concurrently: spaghetti squash with crab and espelette pepper, alongside polenta sourdough bread with Cowbella butter and buttermilk. Remarkably fresh tasting, the crab and spaghetti squash play beautifully with the pepper. The bread arrives tender and fresh, the butter and buttermilk blending to create a wonderfully comfortable course. Space savory bites out with sips from another French wine: a 2013 Clos Cibonne Tibouren rosé. This vibrant rosé has a pleasant taste with a hint of salinity.

Next up, a homey array of wild hen of the woods mushrooms with potatoes and beans. Dripping with earthy flavor, this foraged dish is a prime example of simple, hearty composition. To drink: a 2014 Trousseau by Michel Gahier called La Vigne de Fort.

The final course before the main entrée arrives: Brussels sprouts leaves with mustard. The mustard made with pig fat, pairs excellently with the leaves in this atypical dish. Accompanying was a 2013 Chardonnay from Derain called Saint-Aubin en Vesvau.

At last the main entrée arrives. A turnip en brioche with truffle “jus” is presented, hot from the oven, with a fresh salad. Still firm, the turnip provides a satisfying, savory pair to its smoky brioche shell. Served aside a stunning 2009 gros manseng from Domaine Haut Campagnau called Le Ruminant des Vignes, this dish is an excellent crux for this adventurous meal. The incredible server encourages diners sipping the newly opened bottle of Le Ruminant des Vignes to let it rest and aerate the glass: The flavor undergoes dramatic shifts, giving diners a chance to experience an amazing wine as it blooms.

Finally, two desserts conclude this memorable and exciting dinner: a chestnut mousse with lavender and olive oil, served alongside a fig leaf rice pudding with fermented grape granita. Both desserts excellently combine flavors in unexpected ways. The chestnut mousse has a toasted nutty flavor and blends nicely with the floral oil tones. The al dente rice pudding is irresistible and not for sharing! The creamy sweetness of the rice and the tartness of the granita compels diners to devour their portions post haste.

The chefs and service staff of Semilla have created a truly magnificent experience, absolutely deserving of the Michelin star it received this year. In a city known for some of the most expensive menus in the world, Semilla proves that it is possible to provide a fine-dining experience average diners can afford. Make a reservation online via the Semilla website.

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Post Photo Courtesy of freewilliamsburg.com

Big Screen Streaming: The Peanuts Movie

The Peanuts Movie

-Film Reviewed by Roger Market

The Peanuts Movie commemorates the sixty-fifth anniversary of the classic Peanuts comic strip featuring Snoopy, Charlie Brown, and the rest of the gang. This is the first feature-length film in the franchise since 1980 and the first to be released after creator Charles M. Schulz died in 2000. With a screenplay written by Schulz’s son and grandson, Bryan and Craig Schulz, the film employs the 3-D computer animation style made popular by 1995’s beloved Toy Story. While the computerized animation may be a point of contention for some, fans can delight at the rejuvenation of these cherished characters in time for the holidays.

As always, de facto main character Charlie Brown is a shy, clumsy schoolboy who wants to succeed at everything he tries. Life, however, is spiteful. Charlie can’t fly a kite without getting it stuck in a tree. He can’t even strike someone out in a baseball game. As his failures mount in the first few minutes of the film, it becomes clear that Charlie Brown isn’t exceptional at anything except making a fool of himself. When the unnamed little red-haired girl moves in next door, Charlie Brown recognizes his chance to start a new friendship with a clean slate. This girl knows nothing of his failures, and as such, he hasn’t embarrassed himself in front of her yet. He could start out as a hero!

Charlie Brown’s clean slate doesn’t last long. Lacking confidence and refined skills, he endures one humiliation after another on his journey to impress the little red-haired girl. He’s encouraged by her beauty but also by their similarities—not the least of which is the fact that they both chew on their pencils. Charlie Brown turns to his trusty dog and friend Snoopy for help.

Whenever he’s not busy coaching Charlie Brown through life, Snoopy writes the next scene in his novel about his alter ego, an airplane pilot called the Flying Ace. When archrival and fellow pilot the Red Baron captures a beautiful dog named Fifi, the Flying Ace pursues him, making repeated attempts to save Fifi and put an end to the Red Baron’s tricks. Snoopy’s romantic and imaginative pursuit takes him from the top of his dog house to the far reaches of the world, including the Eiffel Tower in Paris, France, but he always manages to come back down to earth and help his friend.

Of course, what Peanuts movie would be complete without Sally, Marcie, Peppermint Patty, Lucy, Linus, Pig-Pen, and Schroeder? While these fan favorite characters do appear in the film, Sally and Lucy are the more prominent secondary characters, and the others are relegated to the background. In keeping with the franchise, Sally is an antagonist for Charlie Brown, repeatedly making fun of his failures, but she’s also a friend who provides him with psychiatric help at her roadside booth—for the low, low price of five cents. Sally, Charlie Brown’s sister, means well but often proves herself a nuisance too. For example, when Charlie Brown finally has a chance to impress the little red-haired girl (and everyone else) with a magic act at the school talent show, he sees his sister making a fool of herself on stage. Sally’s props aren’t cooperating, as the “bull” (made of boxes and cloth) that she is trying to lasso falls apart. The audience laughs at her, and she’s on the verge of crying. Charlie decides to show his brotherly love by dressing up as the bull for Sally to lasso, thereby sacrificing his slot in the show. He’ll have to find another way to impress the little red-haired girl and prove himself a hero. Of course, he fails to realize at first that giving up his needs to help his sister makes him a hero by default. The Peanuts Movie is packed full of positive lessons for both young and old audience members.

Long-time fans of the Peanuts franchise may scoff at the modern animation style of The Peanuts Movie. Some may also be disappointed to know that The Peanuts Movie is essentially a reboot that recycles classic plots and gags from the comic strip, movies, and television specials. In other words, it’s not particularly original, and the sequences often feel more like disconnected shorts than a cohesive feature-length film. However, the new film’s themes and subject matter are in keeping with the Peanuts of yore, and the nostalgia factor alone may be a draw for many viewers. Good old Charlie Brown is still as compassionate, honest, brave, funny, and gullible as ever. Snoopy is still his lovable, imaginative dog. Diehard Peanuts fans who can accept a little change, will enjoy the film. Likewise, parents hoping to introduce their children to the family-friendly world of Peanuts will delight in the new animation and friendly characters. Who knows? This film may pave the way for a resurgence of the franchise with original—and likely more modern—plots to come.

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Post Photo Courtesy of en.wikipedia.org

 

#FlashTag: Morning Glory

Got a picture that could prompt a story? 

Monologging is interested in your photography. Submit today!

New to #FlashTag?

Monologging.org invites you to help create collaborative flash fiction. The following picture-inspired story, featuring photography by Monologging artist, Casper Ulvscov, needs to be completed by Saturday, November 28th. Every day, different authors around the world will be selected to contribute the next line. Find out how to submit your twist to the evolving plot by visiting the #FlashTag Submission Guidelines… Submit Free!

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Photo by Casper Ulvscov

 

 

Morning Glory

Adalyn woke up early.

There was no telling what the day held in store, but she felt ready for anything.

itsjaykyall Adalyn applied perfume, her scent bright yet gentle. Then she peered into her bedroom. John was still asleep.

  She placed a record a-spin & left. John heard the door. Angelic trails: her scent, the jazz,  morning glory.

John rolled over and checked his phone. 17 new texts in the night.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Graphic Novel Chronicles

564bfbb72c669-5Preview: “Fairly Subtle” & The Advent Of The Graphic Novel

-Reporting by Charles Bane, Jr.

Seemingly overnight, graphic novels have become a literary and social phenomenon. These books are also a serious moneymaker for American publishers. Consequently, the form is no longer exclusively the home of superheroes (though the tie between superhero comics and major box office films adds to their lucrative power), but rather, graphic novels are rapidly evolving to provide a setting for artful literary works.

In 1992, a special Pulitzer Prize was awarded to Maus, written and illustrated by Art Spieglman (Pantheon Books). The work chronicled, devastatingly, the experience of Spieglman’s father at Auschwitz. Since then the Pulitzer Foundation accepts entrants of graphic novel formats in all book categories The foundation’s move is laudable recognition of the graphic novel’s potential for important story telling, and acknowledgment of the genre’s huge profitability. Graphic novels bring in upwards of $875 million yearly  (Christian Science Monitor, Aug. 13, 2014).

Major media outlets are commenting; publishing lists judging the merits of graphic novels no differently than they would significant mainstream books. Most recently, Rolling Stone issued this top 50 list.

The phenomenon is not restricted to the United States. There is global intrigue and indeed works like Persepolis by Marjane Satrapi (Pantheon Books) are able to bridge cultural gaps. This work underlines a common humanity between Americans and Iranians.

Still, many comics artists lament the definition “graphic novel.” They believe the label is pretentious, allowing comics publishers to exploit their product by bundling old products under a new guise. A greater majority of artists, however, happily accept and embrace the title. The wide and growing appeal of the new media format has allowed them to convey nuance and their penetrating gift for expression.

One such artist is Laura Grover. Grover’s comic series Unexpecting: Misadventures in Pregnancy, about her pregnancy is hilarious, visceral, and terrifying. She displaces pregnancy from the patriarchal non-narrative of the experience. Currently, the artist is at work on a two-hundred-page family chronicle (previewed below). The evolving work reveals the full potential of the genre, with an opening that will remind readers of a favorite passage in Steinbeck’s “Travels With Charley,” where the author encounters Basque migrants who leave Steinbeck touched by their openness and hospitality. You’re going to hear more, soon, of a gifted Laura Grover and her current work -in-progress, because the heritage of one family is the heritage of all and adds richness to our common thread.

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Post Photos Courtesy of Laura Grover. Portions Of Grover’s work in this preview appeared in Devil Lake’s Journal and Stone Coast Review.

 

#FlashTag: Missing Person

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Monologging is interested in your photography. Submit today!

Monologging.org invites you to help create collaborative flash fiction. The following picture-inspired story, needs to be completed by Saturday, November 21st. Every day, different authors around the world will be selected to contribute the next line. Find out how to submit your twist to the evolving plot by visiting the #FlashTag Submission Guidelines… Submit Free!

Photo by Jeffrey F. Barken

Photo by Jeffrey F. Barken

 

 

 Missing Person

 

 

Everyone had seen the girl before. Nobody knew where.

Detective Bradley kicked the newspaper & swore out loud. The ransom was high. He’d been searching for months.

The tunnel was rumbling again. Another train sped through the station, squealing to a stop. Bradley boarded.

Detective Bradley hated the idleness of trains. He tried to settle in. He had far to go.

  An hour Past  to the end of . The missing girl’s story replayed & began to make sense.

  Bradley fell asleep & missed his stop. Some stories go on forever, endless. That’s how he remembered his daughter.

 

 

 

 

 

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All Your Favorite Bands

All Your Favorite Bands

-Music Review by Kayla Pongrac

Dawes’s latest album, All Your Favorite Bands, offers listeners nine well-crafted songs perfect for road trip sing-alongs. As with previous albums, Dawes charms listeners through well-crafted instrumentation and poignant lyrics. Likewise, Lead singer Taylor Goldsmith’s voice suits his band’s sentimental songs perfectly, realizing an ever-present theme of sentimentality that makes All Your Favorite Bands worth listening to repeatedly.

The band’s principal strength lies in their songwriting. Reflective lyrics suggest relatable characters, scenes, and emotions. The strong writing blends masterfully with Dawes’s well-established folk/rock sound. Since the release of 2009’s North Hills, Dawes has continually given their fanbase something to talk about—and countless lyrics to appreciate. With that in mind, All Your Favorite Bands does not disappoint.

The album’s first track immediately pulls readers in by their shirt collars, if you will. “Things Happen”  infers that there’s a certain beauty about a sense of inevitability. The chorus—“Let’s make a list of all the things the world has put you through / Let’s raise a glass to all the people you’re not speaking to / I don’t know what else you wanted me to say to you / Things happen / That’s all they ever do”—compels listeners to think about a person they either know or knew, who refuses to accept the fact that sometimes events  occur out of their control. “Woe is me” types will share in the refrain.

Similarly, the chorus in the title track reveals the bands lyrical prowess: “I hope that life without a chaperone is what you thought it’d be / I hope your brother’s El Camino runs forever / I hope the world sees the same person that you always were to me / And may all your favorite bands stay together.” This is exactly the kind of song that high school seniors sing at the top of their lungs during prom. Bonus: this song has appealed to even younger audiences; check out the official music video for the song and you’ll find Goldsmith playing acoustic guitar while the McKinley Elementary School children’s choir accompanies him on the final chorus. What a smile-inducing 35 seconds!

The eighth track, “Right on Time,” again offers stirring lyrical intrigue: “If these walls could talk / I’d defer to the furniture / The piano, the table, the bed that we both sleep in / These constant, silent messengers.” If Goldsmith weren’t a musician, lyrics like these suggest he would be a successful novelist.

All Your Favorite Bands is a solid effort that should satisfy current Dawes fans as well as interest newcomers. Like the wish expressed in the title track, one can only hope that Dawes does right by fans (young and old) and stays together.

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Post Photo Courtesy of consequenceofsound.net

Scalped

Got a picture that could prompt a story?

Monologging is interested in your photography. Submit today!

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Monologging.org invites you to help create collaborative flash fiction. The following picture-inspired story, featuring photography by Monologging artist, Casper Ulvscov, needs to be completed by Saturday, November 14th. Every day, different authors around the world will be selected to contribute the next line. Find out how to submit your twist to the evolving plot by visiting the #FlashTag Submission Guidelines… Submit Free!

Photo by Casper Ulvscov

Photo by Casper Ulvscov

 

 

Scalped

   Ryan knew he’d paid too much.

   The stadium was packed. Cheers echoed. His team had to win. Double or nothing, Ryan was all in.

#FlashTag @  A long trek up to the nosebleeds, Ryan bought a beer & found his seat.

   Fateful scoreboard, his team was down already. Dark clouds hovered over the stadium. 

  “Please don’t rain. I need that money ASAP… don’t postpone the game.”

 

 

 

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